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Postgraduate Degrees  -   Information for Applicants


Postgraduate Open Day - February 15, 2008




Graduate Admissions 2008/2009

 Applications are now welcome for our taught and research degrees in Mathematics.



There are various opportuntities for graduate study in the Mathematics Department.

These include the research degrees (the PhD and MPhil), various taught programmes (The different MSc degrees and the Diploma in Mathematics) and the possibility to visit for short periods


Research Degrees


Taught Programme

    The Department offers several taught graduate degrees. For a general overview (with links to the course pages) click here. To go straight to the degree course home pages, follow these links:


General Information

Application Deadlines

How to Apply


Research Degrees

The Department offers two research degrees, the PhD degree and the MPhil degree. These are research degrees with three years as the normal period of study. The examination is by dissertation and oral. Supervision is available in the fields of interest of members of the Department. The main research areas are listed on the research home page while individual staff members' home pages contain details of their own specific interests.

The PhD degree

The PhD Degree is a research degree, meaning that the students are assessed on a thesis presenting original results obtained in the course of their research. Given the nature of the work involved, it is not possible to plan the degree according to a strict timetable, but the degree normally takes a minimum of around three years full-time study. Each student has a supervisor who directs their work throughout the degree - suggesting research problems, background reading, recommending lecture courses, research seminars, and the like.

At the outset students will invariably need to become acquainted with the state-of-the-art in their chosen research area and spend some time in preparatory reading and/or attending lecture courses. There is a very wide range of lecture courses on offer in London, a full list being published by the University of London and available from the postgraduate administrator. In addition to those courses required for specific research projects, research students are strongly encouraged to widen their general mathematical education by attending various courses and seminars.

Regular seminars are organised by the various research groups in the Department, this being one of the main ways in which recent developments are communicated. In this way, the research student has the opportunity not only to learn of recent results of immediate relevance to their research project but also to witness first-hand many new results and developments in their general field and related areas of study as presented by mathematicians from around the world.

In addition, the research students also organise their own regular informal seminars and discussion groups, and there are regular departmental colloquia which are less technical and designed to broaden the mathematical horizons of all the members of the department.

At the formal level, it is quite normal for a PhD student to be registered initially for the MPhil degree. Subject to satisfactory progress, such registration is then transferred to that for a PhD degree - back-dated to the start of that of the original MPhil registration. At the end of the first session, there is a formal assessment of progress based on a written report on individual studies or research activities, or on oral examinations on lecture courses, or on written examinations in one or two specified lecture courses, or on any combination of these. The progress of successful students is further monitored and formally recorded in subsequent years. The degree is finally assessed by submission of a PhD thesis. This usually takes some months to write, and should consist of the results of the student's research, together with one or two introductory chapters. The PhD is awarded on the assessment of this thesis and by an oral examination (which may take two or three hours) conducted by two examiners.

It is necessary that there be some member of staff or research group in the Department able to supervise the student's proposed research suitably closely. Supervision is available in any of the fields of interest of members of the Department (the main research areas are listed on the research home page while individual staff members' home pages contain details of their own specific interests) It is quite possible for a research student to begin studying with one supervisor, to discover an excitement for a particular area of study (previously not considered by the student) and then to transfer to the care of another supervisor.

Entrance requirements

The minimum University entrance requirement for the PhD Degree is a first or upper second class degree. Application for an EPSRC grant requires a first class or upper second class degree and this, or its equivalent, is usually regarded as an essential prerequisite for entry to the PhD programme.

What to do next

Those interested in applying to study for a PhD should write to or email the postgraduate administrator or the postgraduate admissions tutor.


The MPhil degree

This degree requires a minimum of two years' full-time study. The course consists of preparatory work by way of suitable graduate lectures, as recommended by the student's supervisor, and the preparation of a thesis. This should be either a record of original work or an ordered and critical exposition of existing knowledge in a suitable field of mathematics. Entry to the second year is subject to an assessment at the end of the first year, as described for the PhD, and the thesis examination is also similar to that for the PhD.

It is possible to transfer a student's registration to the PhD degree, depending on the assessment of progress. The PhD registration is then back-dated to the start of the original MPhil registration. A similar transfer may be made from the PhD degree to the MPhil degree.

Those interested in applying to study for an MPhil should write to or email the postgraduate administrator or the postgraduate admissions tutor. Application details and the application form are at the end of this document.


Taught Programmes

The Department offers the following taught graduate degrees.

MSc Degree in Mathematics

The Department offers an MSc in Mathematics centred on either Pure Mathematics or Mathematical Physics. This is a degree based on written examination of taught courses together with a written project. The wide range of lectures available allows considerable flexibility. The degree requires one year of full-time study, or may be taken part-time over two years. Application details and the application form are at the end of this document.

MSc in Theoretical Physics

This is a new programme aiming at a coherent and comprehensive introduction to the main building blocks of modern theoretical physics, thus preparing students for active research at the forefront of this discipline.

The MSc starts with an intense preparatory course on `Mechanics, Relativity and Quantum Theory', and is centred around several core courses such as 'Quantum Field Theory', `Advanced General Relativity', `Supersymmetry' and `Point Particles and String Theory', supplemented by lecture courses on mathematical disciplines essential for modern theoretical physics such as `Lie Groups and Lie Algebras' or `Manifolds'.

A wide selection of optional courses is available, including some undergraduate courses as well as courses from the MSc programmes in Information Processing and Neural Networks and in Financial Mathematics.

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MSc in Information Processing and Neural Networks

The purpose of this interdisciplinary degree is to provide a unified course covering the various aspects of neural information processing. The normal entry requirement is a first degree, or its equivalent, in one (or jointly) of mathematics, physics, computing or engineering (including a sound background in mathematics), at first class or upper second class level. The degree is based on examination of taught courses and a written project and requires one year of full-time study, or may be taken part-time over two years. Application details and the application form are at the end of this document.

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MSc in Financial Mathematics

The new MSc in Financial Mathematics is available as both a one-year (full-time) and a two-year (part-time) course. An entry requirement is a BSc degree in mathematics or an approved mathematics-based subject, at first class or upper second class level, or an equivalent qualification. Further information on programme content and organisation can be found via the webpages of the Financial Mathematics MSc .

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Diploma in Mathematics

This one-year course is especially designed to cater for students who wish to have the experience of one year at a UK university. It is suitable for graduates who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to acquire a relevant qualification.

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Intercollegiate Graduate Courses

All of these graduate courses contain some taught courses which can be chosen from the wide variety of courses on offer in the 8 collaborating departments of Mathematics of the University of London.

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Postgraduate Open Day - February 15, 2008

The purpose of the Open Day is to introduce prospective research students to the various areas of research conducted in this department, and to give them the opportunity to discuss these individually, in further detail, with our researchers.

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General Information

Your Supervisor

All graduate students are assigned supervisors. Their role is to guide you and advise you in your studies throughout the year and to oversee your general progress. If you are a PhD student, then they will normally also be supervising your research topic. General experience shows that supervisors at our department are happy to see their students at any time to discuss problems, technical or otherwise. However, you should keep in mind that there may well be other people in the Department (either members of staff or visitors) who are carrying out research in your field of interest, whom you can contact and who would be happy to help you. For MSc students, the supervisor will assist with the choice of courses and the project topic. For PhD students, the supervisor's main job is to give guidance on the research topic. Some PhD students may have only a provisional supervisor assigned in the first year. It is quite possible that as you become more acquainted with your topics of study, the exact area you wish to research fits in better with that of a different member of staff. In such a case, it is generally a straightforward matter to migrate to the new supervisor.

Study Space

Each PhD and MPhil student is allocated a desk for work, whilst a study room is available for MSc and Diploma students.

Library Facilities

King's has an excellent journals and science library to which all graduate students may have full access. In addition, graduate students have full access to the DMS Watson Library in University College which holds the library of the London Mathematical Society. There are many other sources of books and journals in London, notably the Science Reference Library, containing one of the best collections of science journals in the country and the library of the Science Museum. The College Library has access to powerful data bases as well as much data held on CD-ROMs. The College librarians are very helpful and are always happy to give advice or to help out whenever they can.

Computing Facilities

In the Mathematics department, there are computing facilities for graduate students comprising PCs and SUN workstations running a comprehensive variety of software including Mathematica, Maple, C and TeX, and providing the usual facilities such as e-mail and internet access.

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Application Deadlines


Overseas applicants should be aware that visa applications can take 6 weeks or longer and in the past students have been unable to obtain a visa before the start of term and so had to dfefer entry for a year. Overseas students are particularly encouraged, therefore, to make early applications.


Research Degrees

Early applications are strongly encouraged, especially when funding is sought and for which there are early deadlines (see below).

 

Applicants who wish to be interviewed on the
open day should apply by:

1 February 2008

Applications will not normally be considered after:

1 August 2008

To be considered for an EPSRC studentship, applications should arrive by:

Later applications will be considered while funds are still available

 
1 March 2008

To be considered for an ORS studentship, applications should arrive by:

TBC

Taught Degrees

MSc in Mathematics

Applications should normally arrive by

There are often places available after this date - please enquire to check availability

31 August 2008

MSc in Theoretical Physics

Applications should normally arrive by

There are often places available after this date - please enquire to check availability.

31 August 2008

Diploma in Mathematics

Applications should normally arrive by

31 August 2008

MSc in Financial Mathematics

Applications will normally be accepted at any time up to 15 September 2008, but to be assured full consideration candidates should ensure their applications are received no later than the following dates:

Full time course:
31 August 2008

Part time course:
31 August 2008

MSc in IPNN

Applications should normally arrive by:

There may be places available after this date; please enquire to check availability.

31 August 2008




How to Apply

To apply for graduate degree in the Department of Mathematics at King's College London, you can apply online here or fill in an application form and post it to the postgraduate administrator.

  • The Application Form is available in PDF format here.

  • The application form for the ET Davies scholarship for applicants for the MSc in Mathematics and MSc in Theoretical Physics are available here


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Further information

  • Graduate Mathematics at King's 2008-2009

    The 2008/9 booklet will be available online in early December 2007

  • Graduate Mathematics at King's 2006-2007

    This is a booklet produced by the Department which gives details of the graduate programme. You can download the text of this booklet here, and copies can also be ordered from the postgraduate administrator.

  • Graduate Prospectus 2008

    This is the official College prospectus and contains details of all the graduate programmes offered by the College. It is available online here.

  • Information request form.

    If you have specific questions about studying mathematics and your browser supports forms, you can fill out this form, but you can also write to, or call,

The Administrator


Graduate Administrator
tel 020 7848 2107
Email:pg.maths@kcl.ac.uk
Department of Mathematics
King's College London
Strand, London WC2R 2LS


The Admissions Tutor


Dr Eugene Shargorodsky
 
(Please contact the Graduate Administrator for general enquiries)


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Department of Mathematics - King's College London


This document was last modified by G. Watts